DUCTILITY IMPROVEMENT OF HARD -TO- WORK MATERIALS

Authors

  • Sukhwinder Singh Jolly Sri Sukhmani Institute of Engineering and Technology, Dera Bassi, Punjab – 140507, India
  • Bedi D S Institute of Engineering and Technology, Bhaddal, Punjab –140108, India

Keywords:

Ductility Improvement, Hard-to-work Materials, Plane Strain Conditions

Abstract

The working range is limited to the strain range starting from elastic point to instability point. In the ductile or soft materials the working range is usually very large but in the hard-to-work (Titanium in this case), this range is very small. In this paper attempt has been made to improve the ductility of Titanium (one of the hard-to-work material) under plane strain conditions and actual strain conditions. It has been found that there is 15.5 % increase in the ductility of the material with plane strain conditions and with actual strain conditions there is 10.5 % increase in the ductility. Bridgeman has confirmed experimentally that many materials flow plastically under high hydrostatic stress. Hydrostatic stress is one whose value is same along the three axes. Thus hydrostatic stress is contributory factor for increase in the ductility of the material. Thus working range of hard-to-work materials increase which helps in providing wider range for working on materials like Titanium and its alloys.

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References

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Published

2010-03-01

How to Cite

[1]
Sukhwinder Singh Jolly and B. D S, “DUCTILITY IMPROVEMENT OF HARD -TO- WORK MATERIALS”, JME, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 31–37, Mar. 2010.

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